• Signs Your Dog Has Heat Stroke

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    Signs Your Dog Has Heat Stroke.

    Not all dogs show the same signs of heat stroke, it may be one from the list below or a few on the list. In either case immediate action is required.

    Article Source http://www.examiner.com/

    By Susan Lee

    If your dog seems to be in distress, be aware of the signs of heatstroke and how to help. Look for symptoms of excessive panting, glazed eyes, difficulty breathing, a rapid heartbeat, lack of coordination, lethargy, dizziness, fever, and excessive thirst, a deep red or purple tongue, vomiting, profuse salivation and in worst cases, seizures and becoming unconscious. Not all animals are affected with heatstroke but those that are seniors, very young or overweight are more susceptible.

    Some breeds are also more prone to the effects of the heat, especially those with pushed in noses like pugs, boxers, Pekinese, the bull dog, the shih Tzu, the Boston terrier and some spaniels, just to name a few. These types of dogs already have difficulties with proper breathing; excess heat exasperates it. With any signs of heatstroke, provide your dog with shade and air conditioning. You can also help by applying cold towels or ice packs to the dog’s neck, head and chest areas. Run cool but not ice water on the dog. Let your pet lick an ice cube or drink cool water and call your veterinarian.

    In some areas of the country, you may be going through a very hot summer and little rain and comfort relief from the high temps. You as a human can seek relief, stay out of the heat, enjoy that ice cold drink or yummy ice cream, but your pets rely solely on you to provide comfort away from the stifling weather condition. If your dog is subjected to unusual heat, it is important that you contact your local Knoxville veterinarian as listed below or one closest to your home to find relief and medical help for your pet.

    There are some things to consider when it comes to the safety and comfort of your dog during the hot, summer heat. Keep these issues in mind to protect your dog from overheating with fatal results;

    • The first and foremost issue and reminder is to never, ever leave your dog, any other pet or child in a hot, parked car. You could never open the windows far enough to cool off the pet. If it is in the 80s or 90s outside, or even lower, despite how far you open the windows, the temperature in that car will register at least 20 to 30 degrees higher than the outside temps. If you cannot bring your pet inside with you wherever you are going, can’t leave the car running with active air conditioning, keep the animal at home in comfort.
    • Limit outdoor physical activity. You still have to take your pet for walks to do its duty but keep the walks to a minimum. It is best just to let your door out the door, and once done doing its business, bring it back in. If going for a walk, stay on grassy areas, avoid paved roads and cement walks. Choose the walks early in the mornings and after the sun goes down. Either way, it is still warm so ensure you carry enough water for yourself and your dog. Additionally, walk but don’t run.
    • Even if you have an outdoor dog, encourage it to come indoors on some of the hottest days. Always provide areas of shade and protection in addition to keeping an ample supply of fresh water readily available throughout the day.
    • Keep in mind of the fact that if you are having difficulty breathing, sweating and just an overall uncomfortable feeling, your dog is experiencing it as much if not more!! Protect your pet from the elements!!

    Some breeds are also more prone to the effects of the heat, especially those with pushed in noses like pugs, boxers, Pekinese, the bull dog, the shih Tzu, the Boston terrier and some spaniels, just to name a few. These types of dogs already have difficulties with proper breathing; excess heat exasperates it. With any signs of heatstroke, provide your dog with shade and air conditioning. You can also help by applying cold towels or ice packs to the dog’s neck, head and chest areas. Run cool but not ice water on the dog. Let your pet lick an ice cube or drink cool water and call your veterinarian.

    Happycrazypets.com

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